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Elektuur computers




What is it?

Information about computers published by the Dutch magazine 'Elektuur', known as 'Elektor' in the UK, Germany and other countries.


Copyrights

The schematics found on this page are based on the original drawings made by Elektuur/Elektor. 'Based' means they are not the same. In most cases it is just a matter of connecting a certain line to a specific pin of an IC. So the way a data bus is connected to, let's say a 74LS245 bi-directional data buffer, can differ from the way it is done in the original design. Some times even other ICs are used because the originals aren't available anymore.
I asked Elektor permission to publish these schematics and got this email:

Geachte heer Baltissen,

Aangezien u de printen zelf heeft ontworpen en deze niet identiek zijn met de oorspronkelijke, hebben wij daar zeker geen bezwaar tegen.
We stellen het natuurlijk wel op prijs als u er bij vermeldt dat ze gebaseerd zijn op Elektuur-ontwerpen. Met vriendelijke groet,

Harry Baggen
redactie Elektuur

Translation:
As you have designed the schematics yourself and they aren't identical with the originals, we don't mind.
But we would appreciate it if you mention the fact that they are based on the Elektor-designs.

So you may copy every bit on this page, including the schematics, for NON-commercial use. I hope you enjoy it.


Why this page?

In 1986 I did a sandwich course at Elektuur. After that period I volunteered to do some small projects for them. For one them I was paid with a 'Junior', a small 6502 machine. I also was given some cards that enabled me to build the EC65K for example.

Only years later I found out that the Junior was a clone of the KIM. This inspired me to think of the Build your own KIM! project.

I also found out that there is quite some similarity between the EC65 and CBM 4000 and 8000 series. This again inspired me to think of another project: EC8032K, the CBM 8032 as a bus version. On itself not interesting but using the mainboard of the EC65K means we'll have a CBM 8032 with a 65C816 onboard!

But it was only after finding two other people who still have a liking in these computers, Edzard Kolks and Hans Otten, that I really started to have a great interest in these machines again. For this reason I created some schematics in Eagle 4.15 to be able to produce my own cards if needed.


SC/MP

The very first computer of Elektuur (1977) was based on the SC/MP processor of 'National'. I don't have SC/MP computer but I have the processor. This one was given by a friend, Dick Blok, together with some other parts that enable me to build a Sinclair MK14. In this case I only have to produce my own PCB. Maybe it is even possible constructing a MK14 based on the Elektuur card. But having too many nice projects at hand and too less free time, this idea must remain only an idea for the moment.


Junior

In 1980 Elektuur released the Junior; 1 MHz 6502, 1 KB RAM, 1 KB ROM and I/O in the form of two 6532's. I got my first one in 1986 in return for some research I did at the Elektuur office. It wasn't until I got my KIM-1 that I found out that the Junior was a kind of clone of the KIM-1.
In 1981 Elektuur released a board to be connected to the Junior that added extra memory, RAM and a cassette interface. This interface is a copy of the KIM-4.


RAM-EPROM card

This card can be equipped with 8 KB of SRAM, 16 * 2114 (= 1024*4) and up to 16 KB of EPROM. The owner can not only decide what type of EPROMs to use, but also decide where this RAM and/or EPROM will show up in the memory map. This can be done in steps of 4 KB.

Schematics:
PNG
Eagle


Z80 card

In May 1982 Elektuur released a Z80 card with some onboard ROM and RAM. Adding another card of my own, I was able to build my own Micro-Professor clone. Two month after building this clone, I was able to buy one on Ebay for an acceptable price.


Video card

Schematics:
PNG
Eagle


Floppy Disk Controller

Schematics:
PNG
Eagle


16/64 KB DRAM memory card

This card originally started its life in 1982 as a 16 KB DRAM card using 4116 16K*1 dynamic RAM ICs. In 1983 there was an update so one was able to use this card with the 4164 64K*1 DRAM ICs.


64 KB SRAM memory card

No schematics available yet.


EC-65 computer

I'm not sure when this computer was released as it was published in a special issue with no date on it. Another thing is the name, it first was named 'Samson' or 'Octopus' but on the start-up screen the message EC-65K is displayed.

The heart of the system was a Euro board (10*16 cm) with 8 KB of RAM, 4 KB of EPROM, the 6502 and a small piggyback card equipped with a 6522 and 6551.

Schematics 6502 card:
PNG
Eagle

Schematics I/O card:
PNG
Eagle


EC-65K computer

The EC-65K is the successor of the EC-65 and the heart of this machine was a Euro board (10*16 cm) equipped with the 65C816 processor.

Schematics:
PNG
Eagle


256 KB SRAM memory card

This card can be equipped with eight 8K*8 SRAMs or eight 32*8 SRAMs.

Schematics:
PNG
Eagle


256 I/O-RTC card

This card is meant for the EC65K and is the equivalent of the I/O card of the previous mentioned 6502 card for the EC65. The card can be equipped with eight 8K*8 SRAMs or eight 32*8 SRAMs.

Schematics:
PNG
Eagle


CP/M for the EC65(K)

This is a small Z80 system on one Euro board (10*16 cm). It is nothing more then a Z80, 4 KB of EPROM, 64 KB DRAM, two 6522's and some glue-logic. One 6522 is addressed by the Z80, the other by the EC65(K). And these 6522's have been coupled to each other by means of their I/O-ports.

Schematics:
PNG
Eagle





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